CORIANDER



Coriander leaves are not only good for beautifying the dishes but also neutralize gastric acidity.
The seeds as well as the leaves kill bacteria & fungi & are good for anyone who has gastritis & other symptoms of acidity.
As a spice it adds its warming, aromatic flavor while gently stimulating the digestion , reducing flatulence & the sensation of bloating.
By stimulating the digestive juices, it also stimulates the appetite.
It is said to be a tonic for the nervous system.
In India it is also used for chronic conjunctivitis, headache, sore throat & the common cold, as well as in external applications such as poultices to treat chronic ulcers & carbuncles.
Both seeds & leaves are used both to strengthen the urinary tract & help in the treatment of urinary tract infections.
In large quantities, coriander leaf has a slightly narcotic effect & it was this that earned it the early European tag of ‘dizzycorn’, after observing its effects on grazing animals that had strayed into patches of the herb.
Perhaps this same attribute went some way in endowing the plant with aphrodisiac qualities.

Coriander-mint chutney is a favorite meal accompaniment, having appetizing as well as carminative properties.
The oil contained within the seeds is strongly antibacterial.
Externally, the essential oil of the coriander seed is used in therapeutic massage to ease rheumatism & swollen joints.

RECIPES:

Dysentery, hepatitis, indigestion, nausea: 
1 - 2 tsp fresh juice of coriander leaves mixed in 1 cup buttermilk to be taken 2-3 times daily.
Hemorrhoids: 
Equal quantities of ground coriander leaves & red clay mixed into a fine paste to be applied on the affected part at bedtime helps the hemorrhoids to heal.
Bleeding nose:
Juice of fresh coriander leaves can be used as nasal drops.
Rashes on the skin:
Apply coriander leaf paste on the affected area.
Swellings:
Drink coriander tea:
1 tsp coriander seeds steeped in a cup of hot water.
High cholesterol:
Regular intake of coriander decoction made by boiling 2 tsp dry seed powder in 1 cup water.
Diarrhoea:
2 - 3 tsp coriander seeds soaked overnight in water & taken next morning with 1 cup buttermilk.
Mouth ulcers:
Boil 1 tsp coriander seeds in 2 cups water until it is reduced to 1 cup.
Add sugar to taste & drink when lukewarm.
Repeat 2-3 times a day.
Anaemia & kidney problems:
Frequent intake of coriander tea:
Boil or steep 2 tsp coriander powder in a glass of water.
Add sugar to taste.

Coriander Carrots:

1 tbsp olive oil
1 onion, chopped
1 cup water
1 bay leaf
1⁄2 tsp salt
700 g carrots, thickly sliced
1⁄4 cup dried currants
1 tbsp butter
2 tsp ground coriander
2 tbsp lemon juice
3 tbsp minced flat-leaf parsley
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat.
Add onion,cook.
Add water, bay leaf, salt, carrots & currants & bring to a simmer.
Cover pan, reduce heat to low & simmer for 10–15 minutes or until carrots are tender..
Drain carrots, remove bay leaf & return saucepan to heat.
Add butter, coriander, lemon juice & parsley.
Cook & stir over low heat for 2–3 minutes or until carrots are glazed.
Serve immediately.

BEAUTY:

Blackheads, pimples:

1 tsp turmeric powder made into a paste with juice of fresh coriander leaves, & applied daily as a face pack before going to bed.

MAGIC:

It was regularly used in love potions in the Middle Ages & is mentioned in the 1001 Arabian Nights as a ‘love herb’.
Protection of home , good in ritual drinks, incenses for longevity & security.
Coriander can be used to dispel negative energies & to banish demons.
It is used for protection & exorcism.
It has also often been included in love potions & incense blends.
If added to wine, it makes a serviceable love potion for 2 consenting parties.
Also used in love sachets & charms.
In European love potions, it was mixed with dill & were said to fill whoever drank it with desire, especially if the coriander had been picked in the last quarter of the moon.
The seeds were also burned in incense, put into sweet dishes & carried in ‘love sachets’.
The Ancient Chinese believed that eating coriander brought immortality




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